A mix of a German Shepherd Dog with a bloodhound

A mix of a German Shepherd Dog with a bloodhound

The German Shepherd and Bloodhound are two breeds that are both excellent additions to any family. A Bloodhound and a German Shepherd mix share many of the same traits, including loving disposition and playful nature. They will enjoy playing with children and getting lots of exercise. While they can be intimidating for young children, they are docile and social. A Bloodhound and German Shepherd mix are the perfect dog for an active family.

German Shepherd Bloodhound mix

A German Shepherd Bloodhound mix’s health is just as important as that of its parents. The German Shepherd is known for being a heavy breed, and its parents may both be susceptible to joint problems, bloat, and skin infections. Some bloodhounds are prone to ectropion, an abnormality of the lower eyelid that causes the eyelid to roll outward. If left untreated, ectropion can result in scarring on the cornea and damage to the dog’s vision. Fortunately, the bloodhound parent’s high energy levels contribute to this condition.

Lifespan

A bloodhound German Shepherd mix can have the same physical traits as a German Shepherd, including wrinkles and hairy skin. They are also prone to ear infections. Because their parents’ ears hang low and they have skin folds, a Bloodhound may also develop gastrointestinal issues. While the German Shepherd life span is usually 12 to 14 years, a Bloodhound’s lifespan can be as long as 14 years.

Health issues

One of the biggest differences between a German Shepherd and a Bloodhound is the amount of exercise needed by each breed. A German Shepherd sheds a lot of fur, while a Bloodhound does not. Both breeds drool and sneeze a lot, and a Bloodhound mix’s ear plugs can produce fungus and germs. It also needs to eat plenty of vegetables. The Bloodhound parent needs about 8 cups of vegetables per day, split into two or three meals. The Bloodhound mix will need at least three to four meals a day, depending on the breed and size.

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Diet

The diet of a mix of a German Shepherd and a Bloodhound should be low in carbohydrates and high in protein. Although both breeds tend to be healthier than the pure breeds, a Bloodhound Shepherd may still suffer from health problems, such as bloating or an enlarged stomach. The floppy ears of the Bloodhound Shepherd can lead to ear infections, both bacterial and fungal. Other health risks include hip dysplasia, a condition in which the thighbone does not fit properly in the hip joint. If left untreated, this condition can lead to joint pain and lameness. A Bloodhound Shepherd can also develop allergies and fleas, a condition called ringworm.

Exercise

For an adult German Shepherd Dog and a Bloodhound mix, an hour of moderate exercise per day is the ideal amount of activity. Puppies need less physical activity than adults, and they can be trained in just ten minutes at a time. While older Bloodhounds need more exercise and mental stimulation, they are not as physically demanding as their German Shepherd counterparts. German Shepherds are generally easy to train, and a Bloodhound mix is a bit more demanding.

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The German Shepherd and Bloodhound are two breeds that are both excellent additions to any family. A Bloodhound and a German Shepherd mix share many of the same traits, including loving disposition and playful nature. They will enjoy playing with children and getting lots of exercise. While they can be intimidating for young children, they…

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