Why you should have an American Eskimo Dog

Why you should have an American Eskimo Dog

When you’re looking for a dog that’s full of energy and a lot of fun, consider getting an American Eskimo. These dogs are not the type to eat human food, so make sure to give them a nutritious diet and plenty of exercise. In addition, be sure to monitor their health, as a few of the common symptoms can signal a serious condition. Here are some tips to keep in mind:

Grooming

The best time to start grooming an American Eskimo dog is when the dog is young. While the coat on Eskies is resistant to dirt, a frequent bath is not necessary. Nevertheless, if you are concerned about the dark tear stains under the dog’s eyes, use a special shampoo for Eskies that contains boric acid. You can also use contact lens cleaner on your American Eskimo dog.

Health risks

There are a few health risks associated with owning an American Eskimo dog, and it is important to know how to prevent them before they happen. A few common issues include hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, and a deterioration of the eyesight. Fortunately, these issues are preventable with proper care and breeding. Read on to find out more about the dangers associated with this breed and what to do if you suspect any of them in your dog.

Life span

The average life span of an American Eskimo dog is around twelve to fourteen years. The breed has few health problems, but some should be aware of, including hip dysplasia, diabetes, and progressive retinal atrophy. Getting an Eskimo from a reputable breeder or adopting one from a shelter is advised, as Eskies are known to develop hip dysplasia, which affects their ability to walk and worsens over time. This condition is hereditary and treatment varies according to severity.

Origins

The history of the American Eskimo dog goes back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries when the breed was popular in circuses and other forms of entertainment. Its beautiful coat, alert expression, and trainability helped increase its popularity. Early pedigrees often included tricks performed by the dogs. In 1913, the American Kennel Club recognized the American Eskimo dog and the National Association of American Eskimo Dogs (NAEDA) was formed, which would eventually lead to an official standard for the breed.

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Sizes

The American Eskimo Dog is a medium-sized breed with a compact, balanced frame and a quick, alert gait. Its face is reminiscent of a Nordic dog with pronounced, triangular ears, black points, and a white double coat. Dogs have a longer, thicker coat than bitches do, and the tail is lushly plumed. Their back is broad and muscular, and their loins are long but not excessively coupled.

Colors

The American Eskimo Dog has an unusual color pattern that comes from the breed’s Scandinavian heritage. This breed is primarily black and white, with hints of red and yellow. They are not commonly recognized by the AKC, but breeders are beginning to scan these dogs for health issues, including hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, and deafness. Those with blue eyes should be especially cautious about purchasing a puppy, as they are more prone to deafness.

Training

If you are thinking about getting an American Eskimo dog, you have likely wondered how to train it. This type of dog is very intelligent, which means that training an Eskie can be a challenge. However, you don’t have to give up, as training this breed is possible. Just make sure to use positive reinforcement to train your pet. The best way to motivate your dog is to reward good behavior with treats. Treats will help your Eskie learn how to follow your commands.

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When you’re looking for a dog that’s full of energy and a lot of fun, consider getting an American Eskimo. These dogs are not the type to eat human food, so make sure to give them a nutritious diet and plenty of exercise. In addition, be sure to monitor their health, as a few of…

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