York terrier diseases - when they can arise

York terrier diseases – when they can arise

Young Yorkshire terriers are at risk for painful degenerative hip disease, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. This disease is thought to result from a reduced blood supply to the hip joint, which makes the femoral head brittle and easily fractured. This disease typically affects puppies between six and nine months of age, and is usually treated with surgery. Retinal dysplasia affects both eyes.

Legg-Perthes disease affects the hip joint

When a dog develops legg-Perthes disease, the femoral head on the hip bone dies. While this condition is often hereditary, it also affects toy breeds. It can be detected by x-rays, but it can progress to severe arthritis if not treated. A veterinarian can help you identify this condition early.

Luxating patella causes arthritis

A veterinarian can diagnose luxating patella during a physical exam. This is often picked up during an abnormal gait or skipping motion during exercise. The veterinarian may recommend that your dog be referred to an orthopaedic surgeon to correct the problem. However, if the symptoms do not appear on a physical examination, you may be able to diagnose the condition yourself. Here are some symptoms of luxating patella.

Retinal dysplasia affects both eyes

Retinal dysplasia occurs in both eyes in York terriers and is more common in males. The earliest symptoms of the condition may not appear until the dog reaches three months of age. The disease often progresses to the point of total blindness. In the late stages, cataracts develop and may mask the underlying retinal disease. In order to diagnose the condition, a veterinarian will examine the back of the eye and look for changes consistent with progressive retinal degeneration. Electroretinography may be used to confirm the diagnosis. There is no treatment for progressive retinal degeneration in dogs or cats, but DNA testing for carrier dogs may help veterinarians detect the disease before symptoms begin.

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Diabetes mellitus

If your York terrier is showing any of the symptoms of diabetes mellitus, it may be due to high blood glucose. High blood glucose causes increased urine production, which draws extra fluid with it. It can be life-threatening without immediate treatment. A blood test is the only way to determine whether your dog is diabetic. If you suspect your Yorkie is diabetic, your veterinarian can prescribe the proper therapy.

Liver shunt

A liver shunt is an abnormal blood vessel between the liver and the digestive tract. The liver is responsible for digesting food, so it can sometimes cause an elevated blood pressure in the veins that connect the two. Most often, this happens as a result of diseases that cause the liver to scar. While this condition can present as symptoms in later life, the first signs of liver shunt in a York terrier are typically present when the dog is a pup.

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Young Yorkshire terriers are at risk for painful degenerative hip disease, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. This disease is thought to result from a reduced blood supply to the hip joint, which makes the femoral head brittle and easily fractured. This disease typically affects puppies between six and nine months of age, and is usually treated with surgery.…

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